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January 26 2015

Jewelry Box

Bookmatched curly cherry jewelry box with turqouise stone inlay. Finished with a scraper, Watco Natural Danish Oil, 2lb cut of Shellac, and Renaissance Wax.

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Building Patio Furniture for Fun and Profit

If you’ve ever looked to purchase patio furniture its either cheap and crappy …or expensive and still crappy.

So I decided to make my own. Because I wanted to drink beers on my porch and tell kids to get off my lawn.

With no further ado:

Before During After

Figure 1: My Porch Before, During, After

Step 1: Find Plans.

I’ve never used any Ana-White plans before, but I found these that seemed reasonable. After some review though, I found the cutlist sucks so any of the pieces with angled cuts are listed at final dimensions rather than initial rough cut dimensions. Namely the angled stretchers need to be cut long (34″ish) and then angled. Same goes for the back legs (~22″) and the 2×2 arm supports (~28″). So do your own due dilligence before slicing all your lumber up.

Step 2: Cut All the Lumber

Pine sucks and I hate paint. So I went with Cedar.

Rough Cedar

Figure 2: Rough Cedar from Menards

Cut Lumber

Figure 3: Cut to Size and Length

Rough Sand Cuts

Figure 4: Apply Belt Sander

I recommend using a belt/drum sander on any of the rough cuts to give it a cleaner finished look.

Step 3: Follow Directions (Assembly)

Aside from the cutlist, the plans are straightforward and easy to follow. I built the sides and back as assemblies because I couldn’t transport a completely assembled chair in my car.

Follow Directions part 1

Figure 5: Side Assembly

Following directions somewhat p1

Figure 6: Chair Back Assembly

I deviated from the design a bit as I didn’t feel like using a jig saw, so I just set the miter saw for 45deg and lopped off each corner of the back (which you’ll see in the final assembly pictures)

Starting Assembly

Figure 7: Starting Assembly

I transported the large pieces back to my apartment so I could put it together on-site. I don’t have any pictures of the middle steps, so it kind of jumps from here to completely assembled. Read the directions, you’ll know what to do.

Testing p1

Figure 8: Assembly Done (Structural Testing)

Ta da. A chair.

The beer made up for the sunburn.

Step 4: Finishing

Like I mentioned above, I don’t like paint. So I winged this phase of the project.

I like oil based finished to bring out natural color, so I grabbed a can of Danish Oil. Cedar is naturally rot and insect resistant, but since I had some spray Spar Urethane lying around I figured a coat of that couldn’t hurt either. Lastly, because I like the texture of wax finishes I applied Paste Wax to any of the upright surfaces where you’d touch the chair in normal operation.

Finishing

Figure 9: Done!

I applied the Danish Oil  by hand, which was a pain, but worked out well enough in the end it seems.

Step 5: Build a Second Chair

This second one is a little better finished based on some in-process learnings from the first chair. I picked up a countersink bit to help clean up the exposed screw holes and tried a little harder to be symmetric and even with the holes as well.

I need to either build a table, or figure out a way to add a cupholder feature. (But so far the porch itself works fine)

Step 6: Fin

Before During After

Each chair was something like $41 for material not including screws, glue, and finishes and took approximately 4 hours to cut, assemble, and finish.

 

 

 

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December 19 2014

The Gingerbread Loft in New York

November 15 2014

Live in the moment | via tumblr
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March 16 2014

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Greenland #54 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate

Tackling climate change or the documentation of extreme environments can be challenging endeavors for any artist, but for Brooklyn-based Zaria Forman it was simply an extension of a childhood spent traveling with her family to some of the Earth’s most remote locations. For her 2012 project Chasing the Light, Forman led an ambitious art expedition by sailing up the northwest coast of Greenland to retrace the 1869 journey of American painter William Bradford. Along the way she documented the changing arctic landscape which she would use for inspiration in several large soft pastel drawings seen here. Her nearly photorealistic works exquisitely capture the atmosphere and mood of a landscape in flux.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Greenland #56 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Greenland #62 / 47″ x 70″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Greenland #50 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Greenland #52 / 55″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Greenland #63 / 50″ x 75″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Maldives #1 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

In late 2013, Forman traveled to the Maldives, the lowest-lying country in the world, and an area said to be most vulnerable to rising sea levels, where she completed another body of work focusing on the rising ocean tides. The resulting drawings create an alluring juxtaposition of beauty and menace. Similar journeys have taken the artist to locations around Israel, Nosara, and Svalbard.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Maldives #2 / 41″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Maldives #3 / 30″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Maldives #4 / 41″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Maldives #5 / 45″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman pastel landscapes icebergs Greenland climate
Nosara #1 / 45″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

If you’d like to learn more about Forman’s work she currently has several original works available on Artsy and you can purchase prints over on ArtStar. The artist has an upcoming exhibition at Carla Massoni Gallery that opens in March, and if you have a good eye you can spot 10 of her drawings used on the sets of Netflix’s smash hit House of Cards. You can also follow her on Facebook. (via Gaks Designs)

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Coffee table
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March 10 2014

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March 09 2014

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